Sociological mindfulness also reminds us that we can change a small part of the social world single-handedly. If we treat others with more respect and compassion, if we refuse to participate in re-creating inequalities even in little ways, if we raise questions about official representations of reality, if we refuse to work in destructive industries, then we are making change. We do not have to join a group or organize a protest to make these kinds of changes. We can make them on our own, by deciding to live differently.
Michael Schwalbe, Finding Out How the Social World Works
If we can admit that there is more to the world than we have yet seen or experienced - and more than we could see and experience in a lifetime - perhaps we can also say to ourselves, ‘In anticipation of learning more about the world, as I surely will do, I will treat my current beliefs as provisional and explore alternative ways of making sense of things, because one of these ways might come in handy some day.’
Michael Schwalbe on being sociologically mindful

[TW: rape]

This is the rape joke:
My best friend was four years old the first time his father came into his room at midnight and tore out his throat. He still has days when I cannot hold him because the memory of a bleeding trachea haunts his doorway. He has not been home for the holidays in many years, but – even now – hands are seen as weapons.

This is the rape joke:
I have been told by more than twenty people that they have been raped. To all of them, I asked where the rapist was. From none of them, I heard ‘jail.’

This is the rape joke:
Once my brother told me that I was so ugly, I would be a virgin forever. Unless someone raped me. But even they wouldn’t come back for seconds.

This is the rape joke:
I believed him.

This is the rape joke:
I now look at every woman on the street and wonder if the space between her legs is a crime scene, surrounded by ripped caution tape. The statistics tell me that this is so common that I will never be in a room that does not contain a survivor. Not even if I am in that room alone.

This is the rape joke:
I was thirteen years old, and he was supposed to be just a friend.

This is the rape joke:
When his older brother came home, the boy pulled away. He wiped the tears from my face and said ‘we should do this again some time.’

This is the rape joke:
When I finally told my parents, they asked what I had been wearing.

This is the rape joke:
I had been wearing my innocence. My trust. I had worn the love I held for humanity and expected to be treated well. I had never been taught that I would be that girl, the one who keeps a mine of secrets between her legs – that girl was the slut. I wasn’t supposed to be breakable.
What had I been wearing? I wore the rape joke, then I became it.

This is the Rape Joke | d.a.s

After Lora Mathis’s poem “the Rape Joke

(via sulkiness)

(Reblogged from thisisrapeculture)

mypatronusisyou:

catssecretstash:

Game of Cats

THEY’RE ALL SO ACCURATE BUT THE JOFFREY ONE OMG

(Reblogged from demonsfoxyfate)

malesexistbehavior:

shevathegun:

plebcomics:

dont worry kiddo, when tumblr is telling you youre a piece of shit for existing as who you are, you can just log off and go back to your life of luxury 

okay kid

come here, i need to talk to you for a second

being white, cisgendered, and heterosexual does not mean you have never struggled or suffered or known hardship. obviously that’s not true, and obviously you can have a pretty shitty life and still be white, cisgendered, and heterosexual.

but here’s the thing: even if you have struggled or suffered or known hardship, you have never struggled or suffered or known hardship on the basis of your race, gender identity or sexual orientation. that doesn’t mean you’ve had it better or worse (though i would hazard you have had it better, since there are very few people who will outright murder you for being a fiscally challenged white kid). the word “privileged” doesn’t mean “materially wealthy” and it doesn’t apply universally. example: i’m white, and i’m cis, but im also queer and a woman and not that materially wealthy. this doesn’t mean i’m not privileged by my cis-ness and my whiteness. it also doesn’t mean that i don’t know the hardships that come along with being a queer woman without a lot of money. what it means is that i know certain hardships but i don’t know others — some of who i am entitles me to things that others do not or can not have, based on institutionalized systems of oppression of which i am inevitably a part. 

i understand that the word “privileged” carries certain connotations with it — material wealth, a carefree, happy-go-lucky lifestyle filled with candy and unicorns. but that’s not what privilege looks like. privilege is being able to go through life with the assumption that you will not be discriminated against for your race, gender, sexual orientation, etc. it’s being able to call the police or approach an authority figure without fear for your own safety. it’s being able to expect representation in all forms of media, and respect and understanding from your peers. “privilege” manifests in many, many ways, just as hardship does.

privilege doesn’t mean you have an easy life. it means you have certain attributes that give you an advantage over people who don’t. that isn’t your fault, and it isn’t something you need to feel guilty about having, but you need to be aware of it so that you aren’t ignorant to its affect on other people, and so that you’re aware of the fact that it is something special that you got and other people didn’t. your privilege comes at the cost of someone else. you didn’t ask for it, but that’s how it goes. you didn’t ask to be poor either, but that’s where you’re at — and do you think that someone with more money than you doesn’t have more power? more representation? more privilege?

being poor and living in an abusive household and being white, cis, and hetero are not things that are mutually exclusive. you can be all of those things. very few people are purely privileged. but thinking that you can’t be poor and possibly have advantages over someone who is a person of color, or trans, or queer is a mistake. that doesn’t mean you don’t have hard times. it doesn’t mean your struggles aren’t valid. but it does mean that they are not the struggles that other people have.

and that? is a privilege.

Spot on commentary

(Reblogged from malesexistbehavior)

knowhomo:

UPDATE: 

First and foremost, this VIDEO is LOVELY

Congrats, Sam(!) on hitting your goal with 21 days to go. I’m excited for your stretch goals and I’m super stoked that FAMILY PORTRAITS will be printed. Keep On, Keeping On! - R.

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Comic Artists (I) Ship!

If you haven’t read Rooster Tails yet, I would tell you to make your first visit right now. Sam Orchard is a fantastic artist, based in New Zealand, who chronicles his life and his community with insight, humor, and details so fine the smallest brush would miss them. The KNOWhomo family has considered Sam one of our literary / comic heroes for years. 

(Following is a Personal Plug, not a KNOWhomo Plug):

Sam has launched a Kickstarter to help with his next project “Family Portraits” and assist with his trip to the United States. 

He writes: 

"(I also) draw an autobiographical webcomic called Rooster Tails, which explores my life, as a queer trans guy, with my partner Joe.  

I want to raise money to print the first two issues of Family Portraits and do an American Tour so I can meet my readers (since most of you wonderful folks live in the US), visit comicons, and see my parents!

I love sharing stories about how awesome queer and trans people are. A lot of the time movies and tv shows tell us that not being straight or cis makes us sad or bad. But actually we are amazing. “

I, Rebecca, would love to see that dream come true for him. I am also greedy and want more of his work published for my personal comic/graphic collection.

If you’d like to check out Sam’s Kickstarter - CLICK HERE

If you’d like to check out Sam’s Tumblr - CLICK HERE

If you’d like to read Rooster Tails - CLICK HERE

Best (And Go Sam, Go!) - Rebecca

(Reblogged from knowhomo)

buttart:

dominicandeathtrap:

i just forgot about all my problems

this kid is one billion times more real than i’ll ever be

(Source: coreydrake)

(Reblogged from ashdandy)

But, even if you’re not fat, if you’re a woman, you’re probably still so caught up with your toxic weight shit that you can’t even see straight. During my working life I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been part of these ridiculous workplace group diets. Almost all of the participants have been women. Sometimes they even try to bribe one another with money. They all put in ten dollars on the first week and whoever loses the most wins the pool at the end of 4 months, or whatever it is. Look, I’m like you. I’ve done it too. And at a perfectly normal, healthy weight I’ve done it. All because of a sick, shitful, ugly little voice in the back of my head that tells me I ought to be smaller.

And that’s the rub, right there. Exactly why do we want to be smaller? What exactly is the appeal of being smaller? How does it benefit us? Does it make us better mothers? Better students? Better lovers? Better artists? Scientists? Friends? Does it make us more badass badasses?

No, no, no, no, no. You must see that it doesn’t. It doesn’t do anything but make us smaller.

Babies and puppies are small. So are dimes and Skittles. You’re a fucking woman. A woman! You are entitled to occupy as much fucking space as you like with your awesomeness, and you better be suspicious as fuck of anybody who tells you differently.
Why, ladies? Why must we continue to whittle ourselves down? Who is it for? What is it for? You can walk through a certain aisle at the pharmacy or at the grocery store and see the language of diminishment all over the packaging for weight loss aids of all kinds. “Shrink your waist.” “Lose inches off your thighs.” “Slim down.” “Get skinny.”

How about “Grow your mind.” “Increase your confidence and productivity.” “Beef up your knowledge.” “Enlarge your scope of asskicking.”

That’s a valid message for women and girls: grow, expand, branch out, open up, get bigger, wider, faster, stronger, better, smarter. Go up not down. Get strong, not skinny.

You are not here to get smaller. You are not here to have a thin waist and thighs. You are not here to disappear. You’re here to change the world! Change the fucking world, then! Forget about “losing a few pounds.” Think about what you could be gaining instead.

(Reblogged from malesexistbehavior)
(Reblogged from demonsfoxyfate)
(Reblogged from jewmanji)